Starbucks Singapore Icon Mug

ABOUT THE DESIGN OF STARBUCKS SINGAPORE ICON MUG

Starbucks Singapore Icon more front design features a Red Merlion.

The Merlion is a mythical creature with the head of a lion and the body of a fish, used as a mascot and national personification of Singapore

Its name combines “mer” meaning the sea and “lion”.

The fish body represents Singapore’s origin as a fishing village

when it was called Temasek, which means “sea town” in Javanese.

The lion head represents Singapore’s original name — Singapura — meaning “lion city” or “kota singa”

The symbol was designed by Alec Fraser-Brunner, a member of the Souvenir Committee and curator of the Van Kleef Aquarium, for the logo of the Singapore Tourism Board (STB) in use from 26 March 1964 to 1997 and has been its trademarked symbol since 20 July 1966. Although the STB changed their logo in 1997, the STB Act continues to protect the Merlion symbol. Approval must be received from STB before it can be used. The Merlion appears frequently on STB-approved souvenirs.

The merlion— a mythical creature with the body of a fish and the head of a lion—

occurs in a number of different artistic traditions. Lions with fishtails can be found on Indian murals at Ajanta and Mathura, and on Etruscan coins of the Hellenistic period. Merlions, or ‘heraldic sea-lions’, are an established element of Western heraldry, and have been used on the coat of arms of the cities of Portsmouth and Great Yarmouth in the United Kingdom; the City of Manila; and the East India Company.

Mug # 59 | Singapore Starbucks Icon MugStarbucks Singapore Icon more back design

Mug # 59 | Singapore Starbucks Icon MugABOUT SINGAPORE 

Singapore, officially the Republic of Singapore, is a southeast Asian city-state off the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula, 137 kilometers north of the equator. An island country made up of 63 islands, it is separated from Malaysia by the Straits of Johor to its north and from Indonesia’s Riau Islands by the Singapore Strait to its south.

The country is highly urbanized with very little primary rainforest remaining

although more land is being created for development through land reclamation. Part of various local empires since being inhabited in the 2nd century AD, Singapore hosted a trading post of the East India Company in 1819 with permission from the Sultanate of Johor. The British obtained sovereignty over the island in 1824 and Singapore became one of the British Straits Settlements in 1826. Occupied by the Japanese in World War II, Singapore declared independence, uniting with other former British territories to form Malaysia in 1963, although it was separated from Malaysia two years later. Since then it has had a massive increase in wealth, and is one of the Four Asian Tigers. Singapore is the world’s fourth leading financial center, and its port is one of the five busiest ports in the world.

The economy depends heavily on exports and refining imported goods

especially in manufacturing, which constituted 26% of Singapore’s GDP in 2005.

Singapore is a unitary multiparty parliamentary republic with a Westminster system of unicameral parliamentary government

The People’s Action Party has won every election since self-government in 1959, and governs on the basis of a strong state and prioritizing collective welfare over individual rights such as freedom of speech. In terms of purchasing power parity, Singapore has the third highest per capita income in the world. There are slightly over 5 million people in Singapore, of which 2.91 million were born locally. One of the five founding members of the Association of South East Asian Nations, the country is also the host of the APEC Secretariat, and a member of the East Asia Summit, the Non-Aligned Movement, and the Commonwealth.

REMARKS ABOUT STARBUCKS SINGAPORE ICON MUG

Starbucks Singapore Icon Mug featuring the Red Merlion replace the Brown Merlion icon mug.

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