Starbucks Bahamas Icon Mug

ABOUT THE DESIGN OF STARBUCKS BAHAMAS ICON MUG

Starbucks Bahamas Icon Mug front design features the Queen Conch.

Lobatus gigas, commonly known as the queen conch, is a species of large edible sea snail reaching up to 35.2 cm in shell length.

The meat of this sea snail is consumed by humans in a wide variety of dishes. The shell is sold as a souvenir and used as a decorative object. Common in Caribbean. The queen conch is herbivorous and lives in seagrass beds, although its exact habitat varies by development stage. The adult animal has a very large, solid and heavy shell, with knob-like spines on the shoulder, a flared thick, outer lip and a characteristic pink-coloured aperture (opening). The flared lip is absent in younger specimens. The external anatomy of the soft parts of L. gigas is similar to that of other snails in its family; it has a long snout, two eyestalks with well-developed eyes, additional sensory tentacles, a strong foot and a corneous, sickle-shaped operculum. The shell and soft parts of living L. gigas serve as a home to several different kinds of commensal animals, including slipper snails, porcelain crabs and cardinalfish. Its parasites include coccidians. The queen conch is hunted and eaten by several species of large predatory sea snails, and also by starfish, crustaceans and vertebrates (fish, sea turtles and humans).

Its shell is sold as a souvenir and used as a decorative object. Historically, Native Americans and indigenous Caribbean peoples used parts of the shell to create various tools.

Mug # 82| Bahamas Starbucks Icon MugStarbucks Bahamas Icon Mug front design

Mug # 82| Bahamas Starbucks Icon MugABOUT BAHAMAS

The Bahamas, officially the Commonwealth of the Bahamas,

is a nation consisting of more than 3,000 islands, cays, and islets.

It is located in the Atlantic Ocean north of Cuba, Dominican Republic and Haiti. Its capital is Nassau on the island of New Providence. The designation of “Bahamas” can refer to either the country or the larger island chain that it shares with the Turks and Caicos Islands. As stated in the mandate/manifesto of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force, the Bahamas territory encompasses 470,000 km2 (180,000 sq mi) of ocean space. Originally inhabited by the Lucayan, a branch of the Arawakan-speaking Taino people, the Bahamas were the site of Columbus’ first landfall in the New World in 1492. Although the Spanish never colonized the Bahamas, they shipped the native Lucayans to slavery in Hispaniola. The islands were mostly deserted from 1513 until 1648, when English colonists from Bermuda settled on the island of Eleuthera. The Bahamas became a British Crown colony in 1718, when the British clamped down on piracy. After the American War of Independence, thousands of American Loyalists, taking their enslaved Africans, moved to the Bahamas, where the Americans set up a plantation economy. After Britain abolished the international slave trade in 1807, the Royal Navy resettled many free Africans liberated from illegal slave ships in the Bahamas during the 19th century. Hundreds of American slaves and Black Seminoles escaped to the islands from Florida, and nearly 500 were freed from American merchant ships in the domestic trade. Slavery in the Bahamas was abolished in 1834. Today the descendants of slaves and free Africans form the majority of the population; issues related to the slavery years are part of society.

The Bahamas became an independent Commonwealth realm in 1973, retaining Queen Elizabeth II as its monarch

.In terms of gross domestic product per capita, the

Bahamas is one of the richest countries in the Americas

(following the United States and Canada)

REMARKS ABOUT STARBUCKS BAHAMAS ICON MUG

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