Starbucks Belfast Icon Mug

ABOUT THE DESIGN OF STARBUCKS BELFAST ICON MUG

Starbucks Belfast Icon Mug front design features The Big Fish.

The Big Fish also called the Bigfish is a printed ceramic mosaic sculpture

by John Kindness 10 metres long constructed in 1999 in Donegall Quay in Belfast, near the Lagan Lookout and Custom House. The Big Fish’s image appears on Belfast and Northern Ireland related tourism material.

The outer skin of the fish is a cladding of ceramic tiles decorated with texts and images relating to the history of Belfast.

Material from Tudor times to present day newspaper headlines are included along with contributions from Belfast school children. The Ulster Museum provided the primary source of historic images, while local schools/day centers located along the line of the River Farset were approached to provide drawings for the fish. Images were provided by Glenwood Primary School, St Comgalls and Everton Day Centers. The Big Fish also contains a time capsule storing information/images/poetry on the City.

Mug # 98|Belfast Starbucks Icon MugStarbucks Belfast Icon Mug back design

Mug # 98|Belfast Starbucks Icon MugABOUT BELFAST

Belfast is the capital of, and largest city in, Northern Ireland

Most of Belfast is in County Antrim, but parts of east and south Belfast are in County Down. By population, it is the fourteenth largest city in the United Kingdom and second largest on the island of Ireland. It is the seat of the devolved government and legislative Northern Ireland Assembly. Belfast was granted city status in 1888. Historically, Belfast has been a center for the Irish linen industry, tobacco production, rope-making and shipbuilding:

the city’s main shipbuilders, Harland and Wolff, which built the well-known RMS Titanic

propelled Belfast on to the global stage in the early 20th century as the biggest and most productive shipyard in the world. Belfast played a key role in the Industrial Revolution, establishing its place as a global industrial center until the latter half of the 20th century. Industrialization and the inward migration it brought made Belfast, if briefly, the biggest city in Ireland at the turn of the 20th century and the city’s industrial and economic success was cited by Ulster unionist opponents of Home Rule as a reason why Ireland should shun devolution and later why Ulster in particular would fight to resist it. Today, Belfast remains a center for industry, as well as the arts, higher education and business, a legal center, and is the economic engine of Northern Ireland. The city suffered greatly during the period of conflict called the Troubles, but latterly has undergone a sustained period of calm, free from the intense political violence of former years, and substantial economic and commercial growth. Belfast city center has undergone considerable expansion and regeneration in recent years, notably around Victoria Square. Belfast is served by two airports: George Best Belfast City Airport in the city, and Belfast International Airport. Belfast is also a major port, with commercial and industrial docks dominating the Belfast Lough shoreline, including the famous Harland and Wolff shipyard. Belfast is a constituent city of the Dublin-Belfast corridor, which has a population of three million, or half the total population of the island of Ireland

REMARKS ABOUT STARBUCKS BELFAST ICON MUG

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